Posted on

Invisible Work: John Howkins discusses his new book

John Howkins is a thought-leader in the global fields of work and creativity, and he’s the author of the classic book The Creative Economy. As the world of work continues to shift and change in unexpected ways, Howkins looks back through decades of research and brings his expertise to a visionary new book: Invisible Work.

Work is moving from observable public spheres into the private and unseen. It is the hidden ingredient of true creativity, power and purpose. Crucially, it’s the key to thriving in the AI-defined era.

Learn more about Invisible Work from John Howkins:

Continue reading Invisible Work: John Howkins discusses his new book
Posted on

I never thought I’d become a Cat Lady…

Out on 5 March, Alice Maddicott’s Cat Women: An Exploration of Feline Friendships and Lingering Superstitions is a moving exploration of the relationship between women and cats.

One summer, Alice was adopted by a beautiful tabby called Dylan, and together they shared six years of loving friendship. Alice collected second-hand photos – orphan images – and in her sadness after Dylan’s death, she pored over the old photographs of women and their cats. Cats in gardens, cats on laps, cats in alleys and on steps, accompanied by women who were diffident and affectionate, fierce and whimsical, young and old.

What did these cats mean to the women who cared for them? Why have cat-owning women always been viewed with suspicion? And where did the Crazy Cat Lady stereotype emerge from, when other cultures revere rather than fear this relationship?

Below, we offer a short teaser from Alice’s introduction from Cat Women. We highly recommend you follow Alice on Instagram!

Continue reading I never thought I’d become a Cat Lady…
Posted on

As power shifts from companies to individuals, work is becoming invisible

We no longer have the certainty of being told exactly what to do and how, and have to rely more on our own resources. Work has become more personal, private, subjective, nomadic and never-ending. As a result, work is moving from observable public spheres into the private and unseen.

Just as power has moved from boardrooms into the domain of dynamic individuals, Invisible Work maps the evolution of this new way of being and succeeding. It is also, crucially, the answer to the question of how we thrive in the AI era and raise a new generation capable of working with – rather than being replaced by – AI.

From the author of The Creative Economy comes a new book on the most important new phenomenon in the radically changed world of work. (Out 5 March 2020.)

Below is a condensed extract from Invisible Work by John Howkins.

Continue reading As power shifts from companies to individuals, work is becoming invisible